All about the book: The Mountain

Max Brooks has just published a new book set in Minecraft! The Mountain is the sequel to his first Minecraft novel, The Island, in which we follow Guy’s inner thoughts as he wakes up in a strange world of blocks and must survive.

The guy in The Mountain has found out how to punch trees for wood and create a shelter for the night, but things start to get serious for him. He tries and crosses the sea to see what else the world offers and lands on a frozen taiga coast. He meets another guy named summer there! Guy has already learned how to live independently, and now he must learn how to survive with others.

All about the book

In Minecraft: The Mountain, the protagonist is now wandering a rough, unforgiving tundra full of both living and undead monsters, feeling overwhelmed and lonely as never before—until he meets Summer, a stranger who saves him from certain death… and the first human the explorer has encountered since being stranded on this enigmatic island.

Summer and the explorer must now rely on each other and their increasing sense of confidence to survive—and uncover the mysteries of how they came to be where they are in the first place. So, go Minecraft x ay mod. The Mountain is a lot of fun and feels like a video game. From the blocky Lego-like setting to the crafting quests and the exploratory atmosphere, reading each book feels shocking, like playing the Minecraft game.

Since the release of Max Brooks’ The Island, there has been a slew of other Minecraft novels in the official series of novels based on the video game, each delving deeper into a different aspect of the setting. Though they’ve all been stand-alone stories up to this point, readers can look forward to seeing the intrepid explorer protagonist from the first book again in The Mountain!

Conclusion:

This series will appeal to young readers in particular because it contains many twists and turns without being too frightening. Plus, if they’ve never played the game before, this can be a great way to introduce them to the world of Minecraft. 

The way this book picks up almost immediately after the previous one, the way Guy travels to new locations, and particularly the way he and Summer connect! People will be laughing in most of their first scenes together because they’ve never met another human before, so the social awkwardness that occurs is spot on.

This is a difficult piece to compose, but the author succeeds in doing so well. This may not be accurate, but it seems that the characters spend just 40% of the book on the actual Mountain and the rest in the Nether. Aside from that, it’s every bit as good as the first. Perhaps even better!

Hence, Minecraft: The Mountain is an action-packed adventure novel that brings the famous video game to life. From the blocky Lego-like setting to the crafting quests and the exploratory atmosphere, reading each book feels shockingly like playing the Minecraft game.